DISCOVER

Welcome to the Community Foundation of the Northern Shenandoah Valley. We are one of more than 800 similar tax-exempt public charities throughout the United States that work to make our communities better places to live and work. We are a local organization managed by residents of the community who have in-depth knowledge as to needs and causes. And we are led by a board of directors who have a vested interest – both for now – and in our future.

The Community Foundation was created by, and for, the people of the City of Winchester, and the Counties of Clarke, Frederick and Warren in 2001. We exist to improve the quality of life for all of our citizens, now and for generations to come, by building community endowments, addressing needs through grant making and providing leadership on key community issues.

The Community Foundation of the Northern Shenandoah Valley… looking forward – by giving back.

We are currently governed by a 12-member board of directors. Board members are chosen for their leadership, experience, and knowledge of their community and its charitable needs. Current members include:

Erik Beatley, President
President Erik Beatley is president of Enterprise Hospitality Group and Allen Properties, Inc. A lifelong resident of the Winchester community, he is a graduate of the Shenandoah University School of Business and serves on the University Endowment Committee. He is an active member of the Winchester Rotary, serving a co-chair of the Winchester Rotary Coats for Kids campaign, which in 2018 distributed 850 new coats to area children and youth. He is a Rotary Paul Harris Fellow and has received the Phil Sprinkle Vocational Award and the Distinguished Service Award. Erik and his wife Jennifer live in Loudoun County with their two children.

Kathleen Kanter, Vice President
Treasurer Kathleen Kanter has lived in the Shenandoah Valley for 39 years and is the manager of H. L. Borden Lumber and Hardware in Strasburg Virginia. She is a retired dental hygienist, who now practices in various non-profit dental clinics. She is in the Strasburg Rotary Club and is serving on various District Committees. She served as bookkeeper for the Community Foundation for 5 years, and now is serving on the Board.

Doug Stanley, Treasurer
Douglas P. “Doug” Stanley is the County Administrator for Warren County, Virginia; a post he has held since April 2000. Doug has a B.A. in Geography from Mary Washington College, a Master’s Degree in Urban and Regional Planning from Virginia Commonwealth University, and a Graduate Certificate in Public Administration from Shenandoah University. He is also a graduate of the Senior Executive Institute at the University of Virginia – Weldon Cooper Center. Doug has served many community boards including the Warren Memorial Hospital Planning Committee, Front Royal Rotary Club – Board of Directors, and Warren County Educational Endowment Board of Directors.

Peter Heerwagen, Secretary
Secretary Peter Heerwagen is the former publisher of the Quad-State Business Journal covering parts of fours states along the I-81 corridor from Chambersburg, PA to Woodstock, VA. A resident of Winchester with an MBA degree in finance, he is active with the Highland Food Pantry in Winchester and the Winchester Area Temporary Thermal Shelter (WATTS), previously served on the board and finance committee of Habitat for Humanity of Winchester-Frederick County, and was treasurer and a board member of Shenandoah Valley Community Residences, based in Winchester.

Darcus Breneman
Darcus Breneman is Vice President and Business Development Officer at First Bank.  She served as the 2017 Board President of the United Way Northern Shenandoah Valley, where she has served since 2011.  She has been a Rotarian since 1992 and is currently a member of the Rotary Club of Winchester.  She served on the Lord Fairfax Community College Foundation Board from May 2010 to December 2016, is a member of the Valley Business Women/Top of Virginia Chamber, and attends Macedonia United Methodist Church in White Post.

Cary Craig
Cary M. Craig Jr. is an attorney with the Winchester law firm Harrison & Johnston, PLC. He is a graduate of Louisiana State University and Loyola University New Orleans, College of Law. Cary retired from the United States Marine Corps Reserves after twenty-two years and has served on the Board of Directors for the Winchester’s Latest Rotary Club and Habitat for Humanity of Winchester-Frederick County.

Natalie Greenhalgh
Natalie Greenhalgh is a native of Winchester and a resident of Clarke County. She has served as a teacher in public and private schools in Virginia, California, and Germany and has used her skills in networking, fundraising, grant writing and research on behalf of educational organizations.  Currently, she works as an administrator and training support specialist for a humanitarian consulting firm, Global Emergency Group (GEG).

Don Louque, III
Don Louque, a 19-year resident of Winchester, is currently Director of Business Development, Clutch, Inc. He is a graduate of Virginia Tech with a degree in Marketing and Communications. He is active with several nonprofits and boards and currently serves as the vice president, marketing for the Boy Scouts of America, Shenandoah Area Council and is an assistant scoutmaster for Boy Scouts of America, Troop 45. He is active with the Winchester Rotary where he is the former President, Current Committee Chair for Public Relations and member of the Golf Committee.

Katherine Napier
Katherine (Kathy) Napier has lived in Warren County for more than 30 years and retired in 2018 as Vice President of Business Development for the Clinical Diagnostics Division of Thermo Fisher Scientific. She has served on various community boards including Valley Health System, Warren Memorial Hospital, Samuels Public Library, First Baptist Church, and the local board of the American Lung Association. She is a member of the Warren County Rotary Club. She and her husband Retired Judge Ronald Napier live in Front Royal.

John Tyson
John H. Tyson is a retired biotech executive with more than 40 years experience in medical device, pharmaceutical, and biological systems development and operations.  During 25 years as a member of this community, he has served on numerous nonprofit boards and state advisory councils.  Currently, he is an active member of the Winchester Rotary Club, serves as Secretary of the Our Health Board, and is President of the Winchester Day Preschool Board.

Larry Weiss
Larry Weiss is Market Manager for Centennial Broadcasting LLC.  Larry has been a Rotarian for more than 18 years, serving in 7 different clubs during his professional career, including positions as Club President. He has been consistently active in multiple Chamber of Commerce committees and has assisted numerous community service boards and non-profit organizations during his 42-year professional career.  Larry is an active member and lay leader of the local Jewish Temple, Beth El Congregation.

John Willingham
John Willingham is Market President at Wells Fargo in Winchester and Managing Director at Stoneridge Capital, LLC.  He has served on City Council for the City of Winchester since January 2009 and was Council President from 2013-2017.  He serves on the finance committee of Valley Health and as chairman of the Winchester Frederick County Metropolitan Planning Organization.  He graduated from Virginia Tech where he doubled majored in Accounting and Finance.

Director Emeriti
Mary Anne Biggs
Byron Brill
John Copenhaver
Sharen Gromling
William Huehn
Ken Rice (Past President)
Harry Smith

Jul
18
Thu
CFNSV Board Meeting @ Our Health, Eagles Board Room, Winchester
Jul 18 @ 4:00 pm
Aug
15
Thu
Mason Investment Advisory Services Presentation @ Our Health, TBD, Winchester
Aug 15 @ 1:30 pm
Sep
2
Mon
Thank You Luncheon @ TBD
Sep 2 all-day
Oct
15
Tue
Nonprofit Governance Symposium @ Shenandoah University, Stimpson Auditorium Halpin-Harrison Hall
Oct 15 all-day

Schedule

Nonprofit Governance Symposium Survival:  Navigating Changing Times

Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Shenandoah University, Stimpson Auditorium Halpin-Harrison Hall

 

Registration Fee:

Register by October 15 – $30
Register Day of Event – $35
Student Registration – $15

Online Registration will only be available through October 15.

Registrations by check should be made payable to Nonprofit Alliance of the NSV.

Please send the check with the name, organization, contact info, and any special dietary requests for each registrant to:

Nonprofit Governance Symposium
c/o CFNSV
P.O. Box 2391
Winchester, VA 22604

Schedule

8:00 – 8:30 Registration, Continental Breakfast, and Networking

8:30 – 8:45 Welcome and Introductions

Leadership Development – All About Boards - Jane Stein, JPS Consulting

Team building and identifying, recruiting and training potential leadership ensures the healthy future of your organization. This workshop is designed to begin the process of leadership development with current Boards of Directors.

Jane Stein:  With vast experience in the nonprofit sector, Jane Stein, has been providing consultation and training services to nonprofit organizations for more than twenty years.

As the founding director of the Child Abuse Center of Hampton Roads, Jane forged regional relationships with seventeen Virginia municipalities and expanded the Center’s services to more than 1,000 children each year. After the Center became part of the Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters, Jane opened JPS Consulting. Her experience also includes a tenure as a national director for major gifts for the American Cancer Society. Jane is a past national chairman for campaign training for the United Jewish Appeal, a volunteer position which she held for three years.

Jane has guided nonprofits through the process of strategic planning, board/staff retreats, and all areas of fundraising. She has given keynote addresses, motivational speeches and training workshops throughout the US. Jane shares her secrets for success in these turbulent times, inspiring her clients and her audiences to solve challenges in the nonprofit sector in a humorous and heartfelt manner. Clients include the American Cancer Society, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Susan G. Komen, the Virginia Association of Community Healthcare Centers, Habitat for Humanity and the Foodbank. Additionally, Jane has been selected to present a workshop at the New Orleans International Conference of the Association of Fundraising Professionals in April 2018 for whom she is certified as a Master Trainer.

Jane has an M.B.A., is a Certified Master Trainer for AFP, and became licensed to offer consulting services for the Standards for Excellence® program. Jane is married to Ed Stein. They have two amazing grandchildren.

10:00 – 10:15 Break

10:15 – 11:15 Concurrent Seminars:

The New Standards: Time to Implement - Olivia Hutton, CPA and Principal, Yount, Hyde & Barbour, P.C.

Team building and identifying, recruiting and training potential leadership ensures the healthy future of your organization. This workshop is designed to begin the process of leadership development with current Boards of Directors.

Jane Stein:  With vast experience in the nonprofit sector, Jane Stein, has been providing consultation and training services to nonprofit organizations for more than twenty years.

As the founding director of the Child Abuse Center of Hampton Roads, Jane forged regional relationships with seventeen Virginia municipalities and expanded the Center’s services to more than 1,000 children each year. After the Center became part of the Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters, Jane opened JPS Consulting. Her experience also includes a tenure as a national director for major gifts for the American Cancer Society. Jane is a past national chairman for campaign training for the United Jewish Appeal, a volunteer position which she held for three years.

Jane has guided nonprofits through the process of strategic planning, board/staff retreats, and all areas of fundraising. She has given keynote addresses, motivational speeches and training workshops throughout the US. Jane shares her secrets for success in these turbulent times, inspiring her clients and her audiences to solve challenges in the nonprofit sector in a humorous and heartfelt manner. Clients include the American Cancer Society, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Susan G. Komen, the Virginia Association of Community Healthcare Centers, Habitat for Humanity and the Foodbank. Additionally, Jane has been selected to present a workshop at the New Orleans International Conference of the Association of Fundraising Professionals in April 2018 for whom she is certified as a Master Trainer.

Jane has an M.B.A., is a Certified Master Trainer for AFP, and became licensed to offer consulting services for the Standards for Excellence® program. Jane is married to Ed Stein. They have two amazing grandchildren.

Advocacy: 10 Steps to Advance Your Cause - Kim Herbstritt

The nonprofit sector has played a key role in many of the great social change efforts that have taken place in this country. Nonprofits can utilize advocacy to help solve entrenched problems at the city, state and/or national levels. From community health initiatives to environmental preservation, all can wield advocacy with an eye toward bettering the situation for future generations. We have all heard about how important advocacy is, but where does one begin? What steps and tools exist to support you in your efforts to advocate? This session will provide participants with tips and tools on how to advocate for a cause from the beginning to the end.

KIM HERBSTRITT:  Kim Herbstritt is an experienced nonprofit leader, who works with both large and small organizations to develop successful community-led initiatives. She has designed and executed evidence-based strategies, training, and technical assistance utilizing media advocacy and community organizing,resulting in policy adoption and enforcement. With Kim’s guidance, a cross-border project to address alcohol-related problems received national recognition as a Model Program by SAMSHA-CSAP. Her background spans such topics as:  alcohol and other drugs, tobacco control, childhood obesity, community policing, child sex trafficking, and gangs.

Social Media Advertising on a Budget: A Live Demo - Angie Dunnigan, Founder and Owner, aka Media Marketing, LLC

How does a nonprofit use their limited resources to stand out on social media?  This live demo workshop will walk you through how to use ads on social media to make a big impact!  Bring your laptop or other device and follow along with the presentation.

ANGIE DUNNIGAN:   Angie holds a marketing degree from Fairmont State University. After 10 years in the corporate world, she decided to follow her dream of entrepreneurship and never looked back!  Angie started aka Media Marketing to help small businesses build brand awareness, develop social media strategies and connect clients with their audience through online platforms. She firmly believes that building relationships are the key to business growth & the technologies used to foster them are simply the tool.

Angie has been married to her husband Kevin for 15 years and has a daughter (her one & only), Ava! They love to travel as a family and you will most likely find them at a club volleyball tourney, watching Ava or attending Washington Nationals baseball games!

Social Media Advertising on a BudgeAnticipate, Plan, Act, Adapt: Surviving and Thriving through Strategic Planning - Tom Morley, Founder and President Snowflake LLCt: A Live Demo - Angie Dunnigan, Founder and Owner, aka Media Marketing, LLC

Individuals and communities depend on non-profits to improve their quality of life. “Success” means continuously delivering on your mission, even as regulations, demographics, needs, preferences, and other factors change over time. It’s hard to be sustainable long-term, let alone expand, if you’re only thinking about immediate concerns. Strategic planning is essential to both surviving and thriving. As critical as it is, however, many non-profits don’t do it—or don’t do it well—resulting in both significant risks to their futures and missed opportunities to do greater things. In this session, we’ll explore why strategic planning—and ultimately, strategic action—matters, where non-profits miss the mark, and how to overcome the challenges in the strategic planning life cycle, so your organization can stick around and prosper for years to come.

TOM MORLEY:  Tom has 20 years of experience advising non-profit, public, and private sector clients. As a senior-level professional in top-tier consulting firms, he worked with C-level leaders and other executives at government agencies, businesses, and NGOs in the US and abroad, helping them to set direction and achieve cost-effective results. In 2014, he launched Snowflake, a Certified B Corporation® consultancy that uses business as a force for social good by collaborating with organizations that improve individuals’ and communities’ quality of life, aligning forward-thinking strategies with skilled people and efficient structures, processes, and technologies. Since its start, Snowflake has had over 25 clients, including a number of non-profits in the Northern Shenandoah Valley. Tom has also written articles and presented at seminars and conferences on a range of governance, strategy, and operational topics, including at 2017’s Non-profit Symposium, the 2017 Annual Conference of the Virginia Association of Free and Charitable Clinics Annual Conference, and the 2015 Association for Strategic Planning Annual Conference.

11:15 – 11:30 Break

11:30 – 12:30 Concurrent Seminars Repeat

12:30 – 1:00 Lunch and Networking

1:00 - 2:00 AFP Keynote Presentation - Whining and Moaning and Groaning...Engaging Your Board and Volunteers in Fundraising - Jane Stein, JPS Consulting

AFP Keynote Presentation

Sponsored by the Association of Fundraising Professionals Tri-State Chapter

Whining and Moaning and Groaning…Engaging Your Board and Volunteers in Fundraising

We all have read many, many articles on getting our Board and volunteers to ask for money. We all have attended many, many sessions on getting our Board and volunteers to ask for money. And for the most part, we all have failed miserably when we put all of our wonderful knowledge and skills to the task of getting our Board and volunteers to ask for money. This session has been designed to help us all to take a step back, regain our senses of humor, and then step forward again with a few new ideas and finally getting our Board and volunteers to go out with us and FUNDRAISE.

JANE STEIN: With vast experience in the nonprofit sector, Jane Stein, has been providing consultation and training services to nonprofit organizations for more than twenty years.

 As the founding director of the Child Abuse Center of Hampton Roads, Jane forged regional relationships with seventeen Virginia municipalities and expanded the Center’s services to more than 1,000 children each year. After the Center became part of the Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters, Jane opened JPS Consulting. Her experience also includes a tenure as a national director for major gifts for the American Cancer Society. Jane is a past national chairman for campaign training for the United Jewish Appeal, a volunteer position which she held for three years.

Jane has guided nonprofits through the process of strategic planning, board/staff retreats, and all areas of fundraising. She has given keynote addresses, motivational speeches and training workshops throughout the US. Jane shares her secrets for success in these turbulent times, inspiring her clients and her audiences to solve challenges in the nonprofit sector in a humorous and heartfelt manner. Clients include the American Cancer Society, Big Brothers Big Sisters, Susan G. Komen, the Virginia Association of Community Healthcare Centers, Habitat for Humanity and the Foodbank. Additionally, Jane has been selected to present a workshop at the New Orleans International Conference of the Association of Fundraising Professionals in April 2018 for whom she is certified as a Master Trainer.
Jane has an M.B.A., is a Certified Master Trainer for AFP, and became licensed to offer consulting services for the Standards for Excellence® program. Jane is married to Ed Stein. They have two amazing grandchildren. 

2:00 – 2:30 Closing Program

Thank you to Our Sponsors

First Bank

Shenandoah University School of Education and Leadership

Shenandoah University Center for Leadership in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors

Shenandoah University Center for Public Service and Scholarship

Shenandoah Valley Westminster Canterbury

The Winchester Group

Yount, Hyde & Barbour, P.C.

Oct
24
Thu
CFNSV Board Meeting @ Our Health, Eagles Board Room, Winchester
Oct 24 @ 4:00 pm
Jan
16
Thu
CFNSV Board Meeting @ Our Health, Eagle Board Room, Winchester
Jan 16 @ 4:00 pm

What is a Community Foundation?

What does a Community Foundation do?

What “community” does it cover? Whom do you serve?

Where do you get the money you distribute?

Why be a donor?

What do you fund?

How is this different from the United Way?

What are the financial benefits and tax advantages of giving through the Community Foundation?

I thought foundations were for rich people. I am not rich. Why should I think about giving a gift through the Community Foundation?

How do I set up a fund?

How can I give to the Community Foundation?

Explain the difference between a family foundation, private foundation, and Community Foundation. Does this have importance for my taxes?

How are the Community Foundation funds invested and managed?

What services do I receive as a donor and is there a fee for this?

How will funds be invested? Can a donor influence or tell you how and with whom to invest his/her funds?

What’s the first step?

Why entrust your assets to us?

CFNSV provides local expertise and personal service.

Why not give directly to the charity I care about?


What is a Community Foundation?

The Community Foundation of the Northern Shenandoah Valley is one of approximately 800 community foundations across the country. Endowments are set up by people, corporations, and families dedicated to improving the quality of life in a specific region.

A community foundation is a tax-exempt, public charity that allows people/groups to establish permanent endowment funds within one large Foundation, and offers an inexpensive, value-added way to be a philanthropist. By law, Community Foundations are allowed to “pool” all endowment monies for greater investment opportunities. Each separate fund’s distributions are available to respond to emerging problems and specific opportunities in the community.

 

What does a Community Foundation do?

The Community Foundation of the Northern Shenandoah Valley was established in 2001 to encourage philanthropy and create opportunities to improve the quality of life for present and future generations in the Northern Shenandoah Valley. Our work is to build endowments that will support our community needs, from the arts to civic engagement, to education, to conservation and preservation, to health and human services.

 

What “community” does it cover? Whom do you serve?

The Community Foundation of the Northern Shenandoah Valley serves the City of Winchester and all of Frederick, Clarke, and Warren counties. In addition to funding local nonprofit organizations, donors may also support regional, national, and international charities through the CFNSV.

 

Where do you get the money you distribute?

Donors to community foundations range from people of relatively modest means to those with large financial resources. By establishing a fund or donating to an existing fund within a community foundation, donors can contribute their gifts of cash and appreciated property toward a permanently named endowment fund. Many donors are interested in planned giving and have the Community Foundation in their Charitable Remainder Trusts, Charitable Lead Trusts or bequests.

 

Why be a donor?

The Community Foundation of the Northern Shenandoah Valley donors are people with a strong sense of community and personal commitment to the communities in which they live. Some donors want to support worthwhile causes in their communities, and the Community Foundation can help them to find the best way to donate their funds. Other donors appreciate the flexibility and ease of using the Community Foundation. Because the legal apparatus is already in place, funds can be established in a very short time while obtaining the greatest possible tax advantages.

 

What do you fund?

Our funding is shaped by our donors. Their vision is our grantmaking stewardship for generations.

 

How is this different from the United Way?

Both are important resources to the community and each complements the other. Some have described the differences by suggesting the United Way is more like the community’s checkbook, raising and distributing money annually, while a community foundation is more like a savings account, distributing interest from long-term funds in perpetuity. Additionally, the United Way focuses primarily on health and human services while the Community Foundation can support any number of nonprofit organizations and charitable causes including theatre, the arts, youth sports programs, education, conservation, and historic preservation.

 

What are the financial benefits and tax advantages of giving through the Community Foundation?

Because community foundations manage a large number of unrestricted and discretionary funds, administrative costs and service fees for anyone fund are minimized—meaning overhead cost to the donor’s fund. Another important advantage is that the Federal tax code provides significant incentives for contributions to a community foundation.

The Community Foundation also has a number of different types of funds to accommodate donors who prefer the long-term strategy of endowments as well as those who want to give more actively each year. Donors can choose to establish one of these funds, which allow donors to recommend grants, or can choose to contribute to an existing fund that is flexible to respond to emerging needs in the community.

 

I thought foundations were for rich people. I am not rich. Why should I think about giving a gift through the Community Foundation?

Community foundations offer a variety of options for making donations. By combining your resources with those of others who share your interests, you can maximize the impact of modest contributions with minimal administrative costs.

We also offer an option for donors to contribute over time to build a fund. You can begin setting up an endowment fund within the Community Foundation of the Northern Shenandoah Valley with as little as $1,000, with up to five years to build to a permanent endowed status of $5,000.

 

How do I set up a fund?

The first step is to decide what kind of fund you want to set up. Also, think about the kinds of issues that interest you, as well as specific charities you support. You can begin the process by sending your gift with a note of instruction that you wish to begin the discussion process to set up a fund. Specific details can be worked through easily.

The Community Foundation has Sample Fund Agreements available on this site or by contacting the Foundation. We encourage prospective donors to review them with their own professional advisors.
Gifts also may be contributed to an existing event, or a general or specific purpose fund.

 

How can I give to the Community Foundation?

Some people prefer the simplicity of cash. There are, however, many other ways to give, including securities and real estate. Gifts to the Community Foundation may be made at a surprisingly low cost by giving real estate or securities that have appreciated in value. Were the donor to sell the property, a substantial tax would be levied on appreciation, whereas a gift to the Community Foundation not only incurs no tax but entitles the donor to a tax deduction for the full value.

 

Explain the difference between a family foundation, private foundation, and Community Foundation. Does this have importance for my taxes?

Often, people establish a family foundation or a private foundation because they don’t know that in many cases, working through the Community Foundation offers an easier alternative. In addition to the tax benefits listed below, setting up a fund through the Community Foundation has an extremely short turn-around time. Additionally, the staff of the foundation becomes available to help with grants, screen grant requests, and take care of auditing and financial reporting requirements. Many community foundation donors are also pleased by the fact that community foundations have none of the annual payout requirements of a family foundation, so donors may leave their funds dormant when they lack the time to focus on it in any given year.

Community foundations combine the tax advantages of a public charity with the lasting quality of a private foundation. Gifts of cash and ordinary income property to a Community Foundation are deductible up to 50% of adjusted gross income versus 30% for a private foundation. Gifts of appreciated property can be credited for 30% versus 20% for a private foundation. There is no excise tax on community foundations as there is on private foundations, and community foundations do not have the payout requirements of private foundations.

 

How are the Community Foundation funds invested and managed?

An Investment Committee serves the Community Foundation. The Mason Companies manage the assets of the CFNSV and endowment funds are invested in a diversified portfolio of equity and fixed-income securities. The Mason Companies specialize in providing investment services to Community Foundations and have consistently out-performed market averages.

 

What services do I receive as a donor and is there a fee for this?

The Community Foundation provides all IRS reporting, accounting, and accountability. The Community Foundation ensures that all grant and scholarship recipients meet the tests to ensure tax-deductible status. When appropriate, the Community Foundation can help donors solicit proposals to fund certain categories of interest to the donor. Donors are kept apprised of special community needs on a regular basis. We can also help donors publicize their funds or, conversely, act as a community liaison to provide anonymity for donors.

The Community Foundation is a not-for-profit organization and does need to charge an administrative fee, reviewed annually by its Directors. Please see our fee page for information about our current fees.

 

How will funds be invested? Can a donor influence or tell you how and with whom to invest his/her funds?

Investment strategies are determined by the Investment Committee. Donors may take advantage of the option to recommend a manager, but the final decision, however, rests with the Community Foundation Board of Directors.

 

What’s the first step?

Please contact us to explain your interest and ask your questions. Our phone number is (540) 533-5561 or email us at info@cfnsv.org.

 

Why entrust your assets to us?

An endowment fund in your name, family name or that of a loved one is a lasting way to support your favorite charitable causes throughout your life and leave a legacy long after you are gone. It is a powerful way to pass on the lessons of philanthropy to your children… and theirs.

We work hard to make giving easy and meaningful for donors and the causes they care about by:

  • Accepting a wide variety of gift types (cash, stock, life insurance);
  • Offering many fund types. You can name a fund, advise a fund, or designate an area of interest or specific charity to benefit;
  • Handling fund administration – you get the joy of giving while we do the research, paperwork, grant follow-up and reporting;
  • Sharing our community needs expertise; and
  • Endowing funds so that your charitable wishes create a permanent legacy.
CFNSV provides local expertise and personal service.

The Foundation has deep roots in the counties we cover, is governed by a strong board consisting of local leaders and employs quality staff who provide highly personalized service to ensure that your giving is meaningful, efficient and effective.

 

Why not give directly to the charity I care about?

By all means. We highly encourage you to continue supporting the charities you care about. Giving through the Community Foundation can benefit the causes you care about because of our commitment to the endowment (meaning your gift makes a permanent impact); our ability to accept complex gifts; and our professional expertise in managing and investing your gift. In some instances, a charity may be doing outstanding work in their mission area, but does not have the financial expertise to manage and invest your gift for the best impact.

Executive Director – Community Foundation of the Northern Shenandoah Valley

Since 2001, The Community Foundation of the Northern Shenandoah Valley (CFNSV) has connected the generosity of donors with community needs by making grants to organizations working to create a better quality of life throughout the city of Winchester, and the counties of Clarke, Frederick and Warren. Working together, the Foundation, its donors and its community partners leverage collective knowledge, creativity and resources for a greater impact than any of us can make alone.

 

Job Description:

The Executive Director is responsible for advancing CFNSV’s mission and vision. The Executive Director provides professional leadership and oversight for daily operations of CFNSV, including strategic direction and carrying out the strategic plan, financial growth and stewardship, donor and community relations, operations, financial management, personnel management and marketing and communications.

The Executive Director plans, coordinates and assures the implementation of strategies to develop donors and contributions to support CFNSV. The Executive Director maintains transparent accountability and compliance standards for donors and funding sources. The position assures appropriate systems to support fund development including but not limited to donor management, research and cultivation, and gift processing and recognition.

In addition, the Executive Director is responsible for positioning CFNSV as a leader throughout the Northern Shenandoah Valley in the following areas:

  • Providing leadership: We bring people together to determine community needs, facilitate collaborative solutions, and act as a catalyst for positive change.
  • Granting resources: We distribute grants that meet donor’s charitable interests and address the community’s changing needs.
  • Stewarding assets: We provide prudent oversight and management of charitable assets as we grow a community pool of funds.
  • Fostering Awareness: We offer guidance, advice, and opportunities to broaden philanthropic giving and the impact it makes in our community.

The Executive Director reports to the CFNSV Board of Directors.

Essential Responsibilities:

Provide Strategic Leadership and Nonprofit Management
  1. Run a Financially-Sound Organization
  • In partnership with the Board President and Executive Committee, build and manage the organization to attain financial sustainability and oversee the day-to-day operations, finances and investments.
  • Modify the existing organizational structure as necessary to attain the most operationally efficient and cost-effective structure, roles and functions and manage staff and volunteers.
  • Possess a working knowledge of the laws and regulations associated with charitable giving to community foundations. Work with legal counsel, accountants, auditors and investment managers and/or service providers to enhance the operations as well as protect CFNSV from adverse action.
  • Ensure policies and procedures are in place to allow CFNSV to function in an ethical, legal, cost-effective and efficient manner. Ensure CFNSV follows Board-adopted Bylaws, Articles of Incorporation, Resolutions, Fund Agreements, National Standards for Community Foundations as identified by the Council of Foundations and any other contracts or agreements.
  • In conjunction with the CFNSV Treasurer, provide oversight for proper administration of the fiscal policies and procedures as developed by the Executive or Finance and Investment Committees.
      1. Build and Leverage the Board: Board Relations and Organizational Planning

With the Executive or Governance Committees, build and develop the Board of Directors to reflect the vitality and philanthropic heart of the community it serves, and leverage the Board’s strengths to further the mission and actively engage the Directors in its work.

      • Be an effective partner with the Board in providing vision, strategy and leadership.
      • Establish a learning environment for the Board and staff, which includes coaching, professional development and a robust evaluation strategy that utilizes data to understand impact and make informed decisions.
      • Confer regularly with the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors. Work as a team with the Board President, officers and committee chairs, and assist with the development of goals and long-range planning and progress reports.
      • Assist the Board President in the planning and preparation of Board and Executive Committee agendas, supply supporting information on relevant issues, and develop strategies for implementing Board decisions.
Inspire Philanthropy – Grow Visibility and Assets
      1. Branding, Marketing Communications and Community Relations
      • Actively shape and communicate CFNSV’s mission, vision and position, and steward the community’s philanthropic dollars.
      • Drive visibility and awareness of all aspects of CFNSV’s work in the local market and position CFNSV as a valuable and relevant community asset, neutral convener and proactive collaborator.
      • Pursue opportunities to speak about CFNSV before civic groups, organizations and individuals on occasions that further CFNSV’s goals.
      • Lead the development of a comprehensive marketing plan to reach key audiences including donors, prospects, professional advisors in the estate planning field, governmental leaders, media and others. This includes development of a variety of materials and content for an ongoing multi-channel presence.
      • Oversee all communication activities – both internal and external, including the selection and management of agency partners for public relations, event management and production and any communication needs.
      • Participate in, attend and represent CFNSV at community events of all types, sometimes requiring evening and weekend work.
      1. FundraisingAdvancement and Donor Relations
      • In close collaboration with the Board, develop annual advancement goals and strategies to grow and diversify revenue streams.
      • Lead the development and implementation of plans to deepen support from current and new donors to maximize restricted, unrestricted and operational funds.
      • Represent CFNSV with major donors, prospective donors, agencies, communities and corporations to cultivate relationships and foster giving to and through CFNSV.
      • Ensure responsive relationships with donors aimed at meeting donor needs and expectations and strengthening donor relationships.
      • Oversee efforts to refine and implement a fund development program that meets established goals and best reflects the philanthropic opportunities and interests of the local market.
Grow Impact through Community Investment and Leadership
      • In partnership with staff and the Community Investment Committee, lead CFNSV in creating and implementing a plan to assess community needs and opportunities, determine CFNSV’s highest value relative to those needs and opportunities, and structure and implement a course of action to achieve measurable impact.
      • Regularly convene community partners including Board members, community leaders and issue stakeholder groups in planning processes that result in grantmaking and program priorities, special initiatives and projects that are responsive to community needs and priorities.
      • Lead efforts to create and implement an annual evaluation plan to understand and report the impact of the grantmaking program, initiatives and projects and utilize data to make informed decisions related to program priorities and process improvement.
      • Represent CFNSV on priority local and regional committees to advance its mission.
Requirements:

The successful Executive Director candidate will have high energy, strong relationship-building, interpersonal and change management skills, as well as extensive professional experience that engenders the confidence of the Board of Directors, staff, donors, partners and community members. This individual will possess a deep commitment to improving the lives of residents of our community and enthusiasm for leading CFNSV into the next decade and beyond. The Executive Director will have the character and confidence to work well independently and communicate readily and comfortably in this highly visible role.

 

The Executive Director will have:
      • Strategic leadership and vision both internal and external to CFNSV
      • Passion for the mission of CFNSV
      • Demonstrated fundraising, communication and stewardship proficiency
      • Bachelor’s degree (preferred)
      • Prior non-profit experience
      • Exceptional organizational and resource management skills
      • Excellent written and oral communication skills
      • Strong computer and financial background desired

Please forward your resume with salary requirements and cover letter to director@cfnsv.org. Deadline for submittal is May 17, 2019.

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